Month: July 2019

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Disabled activists have welcomed government plans

first_imgDisabled activists have welcomed government plans to reduce the use of police cells as temporary “places of safety” for people detained under the Mental Health Act but have called for ministers to do more to prevent discrimination.Home secretary Theresa May announced this week that a new police and sentencing bill would include measures to reduce the amount of time police have to spend dealing with people in mental distress.It will include measures to cut the use of police cells for those detained under sections 135 and 136 of the act, reduce the maximum period of 72 hours that someone can be detained for a medical assessment, and enable more places – other than police cells and health settings – to be designated as “places of safety”.The new legislation will ensure that under-18s are never taken to police cells if detained under sections 135 or 136, and that police cells can only be used as a place of safety for adults if their behaviour is “so extreme they cannot otherwise be safely managed”.Last year, more than 4,000 people were detained under the act and held in a police cell rather than a health-based place of safety, of which at least 150 were under-18.May said the government would provide “up to” £15 million of new funding to deliver health-based places of safety in England.In a speech to the Police Federation’s annual conference in Bournemouth, she told delegates that “the right place for a person suffering a mental health crisis is a bed, not a police cell.“And the right people to look after them are medically trained professionals, not police officers.”Roy Bard (pictured), a spokesman for the user-led grassroots organisation, the Mental Health Resistance Network (MHRN), said: “The MHRN welcome any move which reduces or ends the use of police cells as holding bays for people who are in serious mental distress.“We remain concerned that people will continue to be unable to receive the help they need, due to the decimation of services, their continued underfunding and ongoing state discrimination against sufferers of mental health difficulties.“We are keen to see what provision will be offered. We desperately want to see provision within dedicated hospital settings and continue to believe that accident and emergency departments are not appropriate settings for those in distress.“We also firmly believe that there is a need for crisis centres that people can attend – or be taken to – for help.”The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) welcomed the home secretary’s pledges, but called on ministers to go further, and implement all of the recommendations made in the commission’s inquiry report, Preventing Deaths in Detention of Adults with Mental Health Conditions, which was published in February.The inquiry into non-natural deaths of those detained in psychiatric hospitals, prisons and police cells concluded that serious flaws within the mental health and criminal justice systems in England and Wales were responsible for the non-natural deaths of hundreds of service-users in detention.The inquiry found that people were locked up in police cells inappropriately on more than 6,000 occasions because there were no places available for them in the mental health system. Some of these people subsequently died, often due to inappropriate restraint by police.The EHRC inquiry made a series of recommendations, including a call for more “rigorous” systems to prevent basic mistakes; greater transparency and “more robust investigations”; and adopting the EHRC’s human rights framework in all three settings as “a practical tool to improve care”.The human rights framework sets out steps to prevent deaths, including a duty to put in systems to protect lives, and to investigate any death for which the state may have some responsibility; freedom from bullying, staff neglect and unlawful physical restraint; effective risk assessments; and appropriate treatment and support.Mark Hammond, the commission’s chief executive, said: “This is an important and welcome step in the right direction from the home secretary.“There remains a lot more to do to tackle serious cracks in our systems of care for those with serious mental health conditions and we are looking forward to working with ministers to deliver further improvements.“When the state detains people for their own good or the safety of others it has a very high level of responsibility to ensure their life is protected.“For people with mental health conditions that is a particular challenge, with a large number of tragic cases over the past few years where that responsibility has not been met.”A Home Office spokesman said the previous coalition government had implemented a series of measures to “improve the care people receive and reduce the burden on police officers”, which had seen the use of police cells for children and adults in mental distress fall by 22 per cent in 2013-14, compared with 2012-13.He said the new measures announced by May were aimed at addressing the over-use of police cells and were just part of “a range of other work under way to address wider mental health and policing issues”, including a review of the use of sections 135 and 136 and a review by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary into the treatment of “vulnerable people in police custody”, which was commissioned by the home secretary.He added: “We are also reviewing the use of force and restraint and police training, and the Independent Police Complaints Commission is undertaking work to improve its investigative response and liaison with families.”last_img read more

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Leading activists appalled by the prospect of anot

first_imgLeading activists appalled by the prospect of another five years of attacks on disability rights and equality – following the election of a majority Conservative government – are working on plans to set up a new national organisation of disabled people.They want to bring disabled people’s organisations and disabled activists together under a non-party political umbrella, funded by membership fees and with elections to a steering group or executive.The idea came from conversations between disabled bloggers and campaigners on social media, in the wake of last week’s general election results.One of the disabled activists involved in the discussions, Gail Ward, said that such an organisation would provide “a platform for all to feed in and act as a collective, giving us more bargaining power and a voice that every individual disabled person can get behind”.Another, Debbie Sayers, said in a blog that disabled people “as a community need to use our assets collectively, we need to come together to pool our resources”.She added: “We need to work together in spite of our differences, because quite frankly our differences are far outweighed by our similarities and common foe.”Among the Conservative manifesto commitments that could cause a regression in the rights of disabled people over the next five years include plans to scrap the Human Rights Act – with the potential loss of key protections under a replacement bill of rights – the party’s failure to pledge to fill the social care funding gap, and its commitment to further funding cuts, including slashing social security by another £12 billion a year.Another leading figure involved in the discussions is disabled activist Sam Barnett-Cormack, who wrote in a blog: “Given the results of this general election, it’s more clear than ever that we need to make use of every tool outside of Parliament to stand up for ourselves.”He said that a new national, membership-based organisation, with a proper constitution, would be “a strong way to ensure the voice of disabled people in politics, in civil society, and in the media”, and would provide a “credible, mature and accountable voice for disabled people on the national stage”.He believes that such a body could work alongside existing disabled people’s organisations, and anti-cuts grassroots groups such as Disabled People Against Cuts and Black Triangle.It would carry out “constructive policy work and campaigning in all areas, not just political”, including work “to protect the social security that so many disabled people rely on”, but also in areas such as inaccessible town centres, healthcare inequality and disability sport, and would have “the data and policy work to back it up”.Barnett-Cormack told Disability News Service that there had been an “enthusiastic response on social media and in blog comments” to the idea, although he accepted that not everyone was in favour of setting up a new organisation.last_img read more

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Sign up to LabourLists morning email for everythi

first_imgSign up to LabourList’s morning email for everything Labour, every weekday morning.Campaigners for another EU referendum have been given much cause for excitement over the last 24 hours. First, Barry Gardiner told BBC Leeds that Labour would support a public vote if there were a motion for it. But, ever the maverick, the frontbencher had to rein it back in and a spokesperson soon corrected the record to confirm: “Whipping arrangements in the coming days and weeks will be decided in the usual way.” So that was Gardiner overselling, not that moment long-awaited by ‘PV’ campaigners – although it did reveal that he’d be willing to back such a position as a shadow cabinet member, despite having repeatedly indicated that he finds the idea disagreeable.Cue more excitement last night when Labour tabled its amendment to the government’s new ‘neutral terms’ Brexit motion (published ahead of the so-called ‘Plan B’ that MPs will vote on next week). The change would see the Commons vote on ’no deal’-preventing options, including Corbyn’s alternative Brexit plan and legislating for a public vote on a deal approved by MPs. Ben Bradshaw was pleased and David Lammy praised the “big step forward”. Chris Leslie, however, slammed the continued “prevarication”. Why? Because the amendment does not call for a fresh public vote, but merely a vote for MPs on a public vote. As Rebecca Long-Bailey clarified on Today this morning: “It’s not stating that the party supports a second referendum.”What’s more is that Labour’s proposal, while consistent with the party policy adopted at conference, has no chance of getting anywhere. Tory Remainers such as Anna Soubry won’t be backing it, so the amendment won’t pass if selected. Some are even saying that it’s being tabled early by Labour in order to kill off the idea. There has been a persistent theory that, by putting off the decision of whether to back PV until the last moment, the leadership could accidentally strike at the time it’s most likely to pass. But today only around 10 Tories and 88 Labour MPs have come out in favour. If MPs did vote on the idea now, feeble numbers could effectively rule it out as an option.Cross-party backbencher amendments are where the real action is happening. In her statement yesterday, the Prime Minister vowed to be more “flexible, open and inclusive” when engaging with parliament, plus commit to the “strongest possible protections on workers’ rights” etc (à la ‘inbetweeners’ amendment), and solve the Irish border problem. The next steps of the Brexit process will be determined by whether Theresa May manages to pull that off – winning back the DUP, lots of Tories and a few flexible Labour MPs – or she loses control, handing it over to backbenchers such as Yvette Cooper and Dominic Grieve.Sienna @siennamarlaSign up to LabourList’s morning email for everything Labour, every weekday morning.Tags:Theresa May /Yvette Cooper /Labour /Dominic Grieve /Jeremy Corbyn /Brexit /People’s Vote /last_img read more

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Mens Workwear Shop Closed Indefinitely After Overnight Blaze

first_img Tags: firefighters • Fires Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% 0% An electrical fire that occurred five months ago has indefinitely shuttered the Valencia Street men’s workwear shop Arik’s.A sign that reads “store closed until further notice” behind a gated storefront hints at the store’s recent trouble, and the shop’s owner said he is unsure when operations will resume.Owner Avi Mandelbrot has operated the men’s apparel store out of its 1696 Valencia St. location for some seven years. But during the early hours of October 10, an apparent electrical fire threatened to destroy his establishment. His workers discovered the danger.“They came in the morning to open the store and saw it was full of smoke,” said Mandelbrot. “They called the fire department right away.”center_img Mandelbrot also owns the almost four-decade-old Arik Surplus Co. at 2650 Mission St. He plans to re-open the Valencia Street location once repairs that include an overhaul of the store’s electrical system are made. He said he plans to begin repairs next week, although it is unclear how long they will take.Mandelbrot said that firefighters had cut through his roof in order to extinguish the fire.  It is unclear where and how it originated – a spokesperson for the San Francisco Fire Department did not respond to inquiries by press time.“We have to fix the roof that the fire department opened and the electricity before we can reopen,” he said, adding that he was glad that “nobody got hurt.”Neighbors of the business were alarmed by the fire.“The owner’s son caught it just in time, otherwise the whole block might have burned down,” wrote Paul Miller, owner of the adjacent Royal Cuckoo Bar at 3202 Mission St., adding that he and several other neighbors had lost power for several hours.In June, a five-alarm fire just a street up from Arik’s, at 29th and Mission streets, took out almost an entire block, displacing six businesses and some 57 people from a residential hotel on that corner. That fire appears to have started in two trash cans near the back of the roof of a hardware store on located that block and was ruled accidental by investigators. last_img read more

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First Team Match SAINTS TV

first_imgFirst half tries from Morgan Knowles, Theo Fages and Lachlan Coote were added to by tries in the second half by Regan Grace, Jack Ashworth, Jonny Lomax and a Coote second as Saints came away with a 40-12 victory.And Holbrook was delighted with the win, stating he was delighted with how his players backed up the win over Warrington last week.“It was really good. It is a tough place to come and play and a pretty hostile crowd so to come away with a good win like that, I am really happy, especially off the back of last week’s win. It is easy to ask the players to back up and play well again, but full credit to them for the way they went about it tonight – I thought it was a real good performance from us.“We all know how dangerous an attacking side they are so to keep them nil for a large period of the game was a massive effort.”He also praised the impact of Coote as well as James Bentley who came in at hooker for the injured Aaron Smith.“Cootie is tremendous. I thought in particular early in that second half we really played some good rugby league which was great and late in the game the last 20 minutes felt like four hours! It was a real good performance from Cootie and I thought James Bentley was great too. To step in at nine and play 80 minutes here, he defended so well so I am really happy for him.”Holbrook also revealed Joseph Paulo picked up an injury.“Joseph Paulo had to come off as he hurt his calf so he only played around 10 minutes. We had typical knocks and even though it was a big score line it was a tough game as Hull are a real physical side.But there was some good news on Aaron Smith and captain James Roby who could be fit for the derby clash with Wigan Warriors on Friday night.“Hopefully he [Aaron Smith] will be right next week he was just no good this week. Robes has a chance next week as well which is great. We will see how he is early next week but he is doing really well and is very keen to get out there which is great for us.”Saints are next in action in a non-televised derby. You can grab your tickets for the derby clash with Wigan Warriors at the Totally Wicked Stadium in a ‘Bad Friday’ repeat online here by calling 01744 455052 or by visiting the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium.Tickets for Saints Coral Challenge Cup Semi Final against Halifax, Saturday July 27 (KO 4:30pm) at the University of Bolton Stadium, are also on sale by clicking here.last_img read more

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Habitat for Humanity builds first home in Burgaw

first_img Cromartie has been working with the Habitat for Humanity program since April 2017. Now with the help of them and dozens of volunteers she is on her way to having a place to call her own. But she isn’t the only one excited to see the project completed.“It feels a sense of accomplishment ya know it makes you feel good. You’re helping provide a nice house for a family,” volunteer Glenn Mcintosh said.This house will soon be a home to Cromartie, her two children and her two nephews. She said they are all ready for move-in day.Related Article: Surf into Summer at WB Surf Camp“They’re really happy, they want me to ride by everyday just to see the progress,” Cromartie said.Meanwhile this still feels like a dream come true for Cromartie, she said it can happen to anyone.“It’s your chance to get your house, you just have to be willing and want to do it,” Cromartie said.Cromartie said she the home will be ready in early April. PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A mother of two is becoming a first time home owner with the help of Habitat for Humanity. It is the first home being built by the program in Burgaw.“It’s like your first house. I have like a house. It’s mine so it’s very exciting, nervous at the same time,” Crystal Cromartie said.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Black Lightning star coming to Wilmington next year

first_imgChina Anne McClain plays Jennifer Pierce on The CW’s “Black Lightning.” (Photo: The CW) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — A CW star is coming to Wilmington next year.The StarNews announced today China Anne McClain, who plays Jennifer Pierce, a teen who inherited super powers, on “Black Lightning,” will be at the StarNews Media 2019 Kidz Expo.- Advertisement – “Black Lightning” airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. on The Cape Fear CW.McClain also stars in the Disney “Descendants” movie series as Ursula’s daughter.The Kidz Expo is 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturday, February 23, at the Wilmington Convention Center. McClain will be on hand to take photos with attendees. The family-focused event includes everything from face painting and inflatables to video games and learning experiences. The expo stage will feature demonstrations, magic shows and a live performance from Thalian Association Community Theater’s production of “Into the Woods.”last_img read more

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Highway Patrol investigating fatal hitandrun near Calabash

first_imgCALABASH, NC (WWAY) — The State Highway Patrol needs your help identifying a driver involved in a fatal hit-and-run crash in Brunswick County.Troopers responded to Marlowtown Road near Calabash around 5:00 a.m. Tuesday to investigate a crash involving a pedestrian, who was hit by an unknown type of vehicle.- Advertisement – The pedestrian, identified as 49-year-old Wilber Green, of Calabash, died from his injuries.Highway Patrol says the vehicle involved drove off before they arrived.If you know any information, contact the State Highway Patrol Telecommunications Center at 1 (800) 334-7411 or the New Hanover County SHP office at (910) 395-3917.last_img read more

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Amsterdam flights disrupted by public transport strike

first_img <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrint Cancelled destinations are seen on a screen at the departure train platform at Amsterdam Railway Station during a national public transport strike in the Netherlands as workers demand higher pensions and the right to retire at the age of 66, in Amsterdam, Netherlands May 28, 2019. REUTERS/Eva PlevierCancelled destinations are seen on a screen at the departure train platform at Amsterdam Railway Station during a national public transport strike in the Netherlands as workers demand higher pensions and the right to retire at the age of 66, in Amsterdam, Netherlands May 28, 2019. REUTERS/Eva Plevier Around 80 flights to and from Amsterdam Schiphol were cancelled on Tuesday as a nationwide public transport strike made it hard for passengers and staff to get to Europe’s third largest airport.Almost all train, bus and tram drivers in the Netherlands staged a 24-hour strike on Tuesday, protesting over proposed reforms of the country’s pension system.Airline KLM had advised passengers to postpone their travel plans and offered them the opportunity to reschedule flights to another date free of charge.Britain’s EasyJet cancelled 24 flights after the airport had asked airlines to limit the number of passengers coming to Schiphol as much as possible.Other operators to cancel flights and offer alternative travel dates were United Airlines, Flybe and Ryanair.The strikes, which led to large traffic jams around major Dutch cities early on Tuesday, are part of larger protests, which are expected to lead to walk-outs in factories and amongst public services workers on Wednesday.Unions are demanding the government drops its plans to increase the retirement age and cap it at its current level of 66 as well as making it easier for people with physically demanding jobs to stop working earlier.WhatsApplast_img read more

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Mensija chapel threatened by massive development

first_img SharePrint <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> The Archdiocese of Malta sent its objection against a proposed massive development in Mensija, San Ġwann. Both the Curia and the Superintendence of Cultural Heritage have expressed their concerns over the potential damage to the chapel in Triq is-Santwarju, in Mensija where an application was filed proposing a large development on the plot of land adjacent to it.Application PA/04214/19 is proposing the demolition of existing dilapidated structures and the excavation and construction of underlying parking, a Class 4A Office, duplex residential units with gardens and pools, and overlying residential apartments, including a receded floor. The representation period closes on Friday. Although the application has yet to be approved, the project is already being advertised.The Administrative Secretary of the Archdiocese of Malta, Michael Pace Ross, in his comments to Newsbook.com.mt explained that the chapel was built over a large cave, which is very fragile, warning that excavations threaten its very existence. Pace Ross stressed on the chapel’s historical value and uniqueness, and invited the public to visit it. He also spoke about the development’s impact on the surrounding environment and the traffic which will be generated.The site footprint  is located along the ridge overlooking Wied Għomor which is an area of ecological importance. The area has a high cultural and historical value, with the hamlet of Mensija already visible in 1908. The site footprint is also located at 200m from the site of archaeological importance, protecting the Mensija cart ruts.The Superintendence of Cultural Heritage warned that the proposed development may pose a threat to known and unknown cultural heritage, and if approved, would require that works are archaeologically monitored.The Superintendence noted that no proper survey of a cave was submitted, which shows its extension and actual distance from the limit of the excavation. It also requested photomontages for better understanding of the proposed project on the cultural landscape.Among those objecting, is local councillor Joe Aquilina who was elected on behalf of Partit Nazzjonalista. In his objection submitted with the Planning Authority, Aquilina objected on the basis that “the development exceeds 30m in depth, residential units are at basement levels, while some residential units have no street facade rendering it an internal development which is not allowed”. Aquilina further stated that the residents have expressed their concern about the carob trees and the caves in the vicinity which need to be taken into consideration when evaluating the application.A couple who objected against the development, said that the a large cave known as Għar Ħarruba underlies part of the proposed development which raises serious concerns about the structural stability of the cave. Other concerns raised is about the possibility that any disturbance along the steep slope could lead to large pieces of rock or boulders to roll down dangerously into their property. Further there are some 30 very old carob trees on site.A resident urged the Planning Authority not to ‘bury them alive with the proposed development’.The Environment and Resource Authority said that it requires further time to assess this application. However it urged for the safeguarding of the caves, saying that ‘whilst noting that the site lies within development zones, there is a major karstic doline immediately to the site’.  ERA added that in this context the current proposal and the excavations works which are being proposed are of significant concern.WhatsApplast_img read more

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Archbishop Scicluna celebrates 33 years of priesthood

first_imgArchbishop Charles Scicluna is celebrating 33 years since he was ordained priest. Mgr Scicluna was appointed Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Malta in 2015. He has been serving as Adjunct Secretary of the Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith since November 2018.READ: Watch: A new appointment for Archbishop Scicluna by Pope FrancisHe was ordained priest by Archbishop Joseph Mercieca in June 1986.Archbishop Scicluna was born in Toronto on 15 May 1959. His family returned to Malta when he was 11 months old.In 1991 he graduated in canon law from the University of Rome.READ: Archbishop Scicluna’s appointment praised by international mediaWhatsApp SharePrint <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more

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Google trumps Facebook in customer satisfaction

first_imgAdvertisement That’s down nearly 8% from Facebook’s previous ranking, indicating a drop in popularity of the social network that is by far the world’s most populous, with more than 900 million active users. By contrast, Google+ has about 150 million monthly active users.“If Facebook doesn’t feel the pressure to improve customer satisfaction now, that may soon change,” ForeSee’s CEO, Larry Freed, said in a news release. ForeSee is an analytics firm that partnered with ACSI to create the report.This was the first year Google+ was included in the ranking, which is based on interviews with consumers. ACSI, which releases monthly reports in a variety of business categories, says it interviews 70,000 people a year. – Advertisement – With a rating of 63, LinkedIn, another popular network, barely scored higher than Facebook in terms of customer satisfaction in Tuesday’s report. YouTube, which is owned by Google, received a 73; Pinterest a 73; and Twitter a 64. (MySpace, in case you’re wondering, isn’t part of the list anymore).Some people who use Google+ weren’t surprised by the ranking.“Makes sense,” one user wrote in response to a CNN question about the news. “I’m sure a lot of people use Facebook because they genuinely love it, but a huge number are also using it because they feel forced to — because everyone else they know is using it, or they think they need to have a business presence there. So there are many people using Facebook on a regular basis who don’t actually like it and have plenty to complain about. Whereas the majority of people using Google+ regularly only bother to do so because they really prefer it over other sites like Facebook.”ACSI says Google+ is strong in areas where Facebook is weak.“According to the report, Google+’s strong showing is a result of an absence of traditional advertising and what is seen as a superior mobile product,” the group says in its news release.“Google+’s strengths may be Facebook’s weaknesses, as users complain about ads and privacy concerns. However, the most frequent complaints about Facebook are changes to its user interface, most recently the introduction of the Timeline feature.”The index was founded at the University of Michigan and gets support from ForeSee for its e-commerce and e-business rankings.Are you surprised to see Google+ ranked above Facebook? Let us know what you think in the comments section.Source: CNNlast_img read more

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Apple targets Galaxy SIII Note in US patent suit

first_imgAdvertisement Apple is targeting 21 devices released between August 2011 and August 2012: Galaxy S III, Verizon Galaxy S III, Galaxy Note, Galaxy S II Skyrocket, Galaxy S II Epic 4G Touch, Galaxy S II, Galaxy S II T-Mobile, Galaxy S II AT&T, Galaxy Nexus, Illusion, Captivate Glide, Exhibit II 4G, Stratosphere, Transform Ultra, Admire, Conquer 4G, Dart smartphones, Galaxy Player 4.0, Galaxy Player 5.0, Galaxy Note 10.1, Galaxy Tab 7.0 Plus, and Galaxy Tab 8.9.Apple in its filing said that, despite the other lawsuit before Judge Lucy Koh, Samsung “continued to flood the market with copycat products,” and the lawsuit is seeking to put an end to Samsung’s actions.“Samsung has systematically copied Apple’s innovative technology and products, features, and designs, and has deluged markets with infringing devices in an effort to usurp market share from Apple. Instead of pursuing independent product development, Samsung slavishly copied Apple’s innovative technology, with its elegant and distinctive user interfaces product design, in violation of Apple’s valuable intellectual property rights,” Apple said in its filing. – Advertisement – It is unclear whether this new filing will have any impact on the ongoing Australian case. No new filings have been made since August 29, and Apple’s Australian spokesperson declined to comment when asked about it by ZDNet.A hearing on whether the devices will be banned is scheduled to be heard in December. A Samsung executive was reported as saying that the company may even consider altering the functionality of these devices to ensure that they remain on the market in the US.You can download the Amended Galaxy Complain Full PDF from Scribd hereSource: ZDNetlast_img read more

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Telecoms ask for more time for Sim card registration

first_imgAdvertisement After a year of calls for mobile phone subscribers to register their Sim cards, the turn-up remains poor, just three days to the deadline.Worse still, the registration process has been beset by disorganisation, with the network systems failing to recognize numbers that were registered months earlier. In the end, there are calls to have the registration period extended beyond the March 1 deadline, the date the Uganda Communications Commission (UCC) has promised to disconnect all those lines that might not be registered.Patience Tumwesigye Tindyebwa, Orange Uganda’s marketing and brand manager, told The Observer they would wish to see the deadline extended incase not all their subscribers were registered. – Advertisement – “Our aim is to make sure that all our subscribers are registered. If it so happens and the deadline reaches when we haven’t finished registering them, we would like to see the deadline extended,” she said. “The good news is that we have registered about 75% of our subscribers. We are hoping in the remaining days we reach all of them,” she added.Telcom firms like Orange have a selfish interest in the deadline being extended. Blocking unregistered subscribers will mean losing revenue. There is a bigger economic impact too. The disconnection could also injure the tax collections by Uganda Revenue Authority. The telecom industry is one of the three largest taxpayers.In a way, the telecom companies should share the blame on the low numbers of registered subscribers. UCC spokesperson Fred Otunnu says three out of four Ugandans – or 75% – have registered so far. Pius Asiimwe’s case is a typical example of why some companies are being accused of failing the process of registration. Asiimwe says he registered with one of the agents of MTN and thought he was done with the hassle. Instead, he was later told that his “registration had not been completed.”Telecom firms say they have encountered challenges such as absence of national identity cards, and the suspicions behind the whole process. Some sections of the public think the exercise is part of a wider spying machinery by the state. The government says the process is purely meant to curb fraud and grab any criminals.UCC’s Fred Otunnu on Friday insisted the registration deadline would not be changed.Credit: Observerlast_img read more

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Microsoft releases Office Mobile for Office 365 Android app

first_imgAdvertisement Microsoft has released Office 365 for Android users following its previous release of the iOS version. It allows you to edit docs on your phone and sync them with SkyDrive.The user interface looks lifted straight out of the Windows Phone 8 version, but the flat design goes well with Android’s Holo looks. The app supports Word, Excel and PowerPoint docs with charts, animations, SmartArt Graphics, shapes and comments. – Advertisement – Better still, the Office Mobile for Office 365 reflows the documents so that they look good on your phone and are easy to edit, but that doesn’t break the formatting on the PC. Speaking of the PC app, the last files you edited will show up in the Recent Documents tab so you can continue editing on the phone right away, even the Resume Reading feature works (it takes you to the point of the document you were editing last).Sharing is enabled, so you can easily share a doc from your phone when you’re done with the corrections.The Office Mobile for Office 365 (catchy name, isn’t it?) is available right now in the Google Play Store, but there are some limitations. For one, the app is available only in the US, but Microsoft is promising to add more countries to the list in the coming weeks.Also, you need an Android 4.0+ phone. Note phone, not tablet – it’s an annoying limitation as people are more likely to edit a doc on a tablet than a phone. Also you need an Office 365 subscription to use the app (you can get a 30 day trial), unlike the WP8 version which is free out of the box. And unlike the iOS version, which also requires a subscription, you can’t buy one from the app itself, you need to go www.office.come and get one from there.Credit: GSMArenalast_img read more

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Google Has Made An EbolaProof Tablet

first_imgAdvertisement Google and a group of technology volunteers have developed a tablet device that could help doctors in the fight against Ebola. According to the developers, the tablet has been designed in such a way that it can survive being doused in chlorine; be used while wearing gloves; and is resistant to storms as well as high humidity.According to BBC.com, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) had put out a call for an Ebola-proof tablet to help teams record vital patient information. According to the report, the need for the Ebola-proof tablet had arisen when doctors began to shout patient notes across fences in order to avoid contamination.According to Médecins Sans Frontières, Ebola is passed on through contact with body fluids, and even a single piece of paper leaving a high-risk zone poses a risk of passing on the infection. Additionally, health-care workers caring for patients have to wear full protective suits with goggles and multiple layers of gloves, despite soaring temperatures. – Advertisement – But dictating notes across a fence at the end of exhausting shifts while wearing masks was a “recipe for error”, MSF revealed. According to the report, the tablet has waterproof casing at an “industrial level” and it has no sharp edges in order to prevent protective clothing from being pierced.The device can be charged quickly and wirelessly by being placed on a table. The tablet connects wirelessly to a tiny local network server that is roughly the size of a postage stamp. The report also revealed that health workers can also use the device to track a patient’s progress – comparing pulse, temperature and other results over time.The device is currently being tested at MSF treatment centres in Sierra Leone.last_img read more

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Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge Officially Receive the Android 70 Nougat

first_imgImage Credit: Tech Times Advertisement Last year reports showed that Samsung S7 and S7 Edge might receive the Android 7.1.1 directly, but seems it didn’t work out as the South Korean smartphone firm officially rolls out Android 7.0 Nougat update for the phablets. The Android 7.0 Nougat roll-out reportedly started last week itself though Samsung has only now confirmed the update.The company also confirms plans to expand the Android 7.0 Nougat update to older devices including; Samsung Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge and S6 Edge Plus, Galaxy Note 5, Galaxy A3, and Galaxy A8 smartphones, plus the Galaxy Tab A and Galaxy Tab S2 which will/might happen in the first quarter of this year.Samsung will introduce some major UX changes including new Quick panel; which will feature cleaner aesthetics and Notification Window; will now be grouped to display information more clearly and also support Direct Replies, Multi-window; will allow users to work in split screen, Performance mode; will let users optimize the smartphone, and Samsung Pass; will be expanded to support mobile banking app integration.[related-posts] – Advertisement – Other phones that have received the Android 7.0 update include; HTC mobiles; HTC 10, HTC One M9, LG mobiles; LG G5, Nexus 9 LTE, Sony mobiles; while Huawei mobiles; the P9, P9 Lite, P9 Plus, Mate 8, etc, and finally the Motorola Nexus 6 & HTC Nexus 9 will/might receive the update in the first quarter of this year as the companies had mentioned.last_img read more

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Im off to back the Wizard…

first_img[dropcap]C[/dropcap]ome on the Aussie.No I’m not talking cricket – have had a belly full of that – but talking of belly full’s it’s the arrers tonight as the World Championship (sorry but there is only ONE WC and it’s this one) reaches the semi-final stage.I’m having a decent bet tonight on the Wizard from Down Under AKA Simon Whitlock in the first semi due on the oche at 7.15pmTo help you get in the mood with the walk-on music….“I come from a land down underWhere beer does flow and men chunderCan’t you hear, can’t you hear the thunderYou better run, you better take cover.”Whitlock is playing well and has a 3-2 head to head record over Wright who has scraped into the semis with a 4-3 win over Michael Smith in the third round and overcoming Wes Newton 5-4 in a tie-breaker in the quarter finals.By contrast Whitlock’s progress has been much smoother. He didn’t drop a set until also getting involved in a semi-final tie-breaker where he had to use all of his experience to get past Ian White 5-4.Whitlock’s half of the draw was blown wide open by the shock second-round exit of 16-times world champion Phil Taylor, the man who defeated him in the 2010 final.The fourth seed this year Whitlock can win this and get in another final.RECOMMENDED BET (1-10 points)10 points WHITLOCK at around 4/5 with Star SportsWhat’s your view? CALL STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321last_img read more

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STARTERS ORDERS Friday

first_img[dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Friday 28 FebruaryRACING1.30 LingfieldWhispering Star 5/1 > 3/12.40 DoncasterBull And Bush 11/8 > evens4.55 DoncasterJack The Gent 8/1 > 5/1What’s your view?CALL STAR SPORTS ON 08000 521 321last_img

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Nanotech pioneer Nobel laureate Richard Smalley dead at 62

first_imgAddThis Share1 CONTACT: Jade Boyd PHONE: (713) 348-6778 E-MAIL: jadeboyd@rice.edu Nanotech pioneer, Nobel laureate Richard Smalley dead at 62 Rice chemist and buckyball discoverer became statesman for nanotechnology Nobel laureate Richard Smalley, co-discoverer of the buckyball and one of the best-known and respected scientists in nanotechnology, died today in Houston after a long battle with cancer. He was 62. Smalley, who joined Rice University in 1976, shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with fellow Rice chemist Robert Curl and British chemist Sir Harold Kroto for the discovery of buckminsterfullerene, or “buckyballs,” a new form of carbon. Smalley died this afternoon at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, surrounded by family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Deborah Smalley; two sons, Chad and Preston; a brother, Clayton; two sisters, Linda and Mary Jill; stepdaughters Eva and Allison; granddaughter Bridget and a host of friends and relatives. “We will miss Rick’s brilliance, commitment, energy, enthusiasm and humanity,” Rice President David Leebron said. “He epitomized what we value at Rice: pathbreaking research, commitment to teaching, and contribution to the betterment of our world. In important ways, Rick helped build and shape the Rice University of today. His extraordinary scientific contributions, recognized with the Nobel Prize, will form the foundation of new technologies that will improve life for millions. His life’s work and his brave fight against a terrible disease were an inspiration to all.” Colleagues and scientific leaders say it is hard to overestimate the role Smalley played in founding and fostering the development of nanotechnology, one of the most important and exciting new areas of scientific inquiry to arise in the past quarter century. “Rick was incredibly creative and had the ability to make his creative vision a reality,” said Curl, University Professor Emeritus, the Kenneth S. Pitzer-Schlumberger Professor Emeritus of Natural Sciences and professor emeritus of chemistry. “His mind was sharp and incisive. Whenever I brought up some point that I thought he might have overlooked, I found that he had already thought of it and refuted it in his own mind. I have met many eminent scientists; I’ve never met anyone smarter, more creative, and more focused. His mind was like a searchlight bringing whatever it looked at into clarity.” No one was better than Smalley himself at describing the discipline in plainspoken terms. “We are about to be able to build things that work on the smallest possible length scales, atom by atom, with the ultimate level of finesse,” Smalley told the U.S. House of Representatives while testifying in 1999 in support of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). “These little nanothings, and the technology that assembles and manipulates them — nanotechnology — will revolutionize our industries and our lives.” Nanotechnology draws its name from the nanometer, or one-billionth of a meter. Buckyballs measure one nanometer in diameter, and their discovery at Rice in 1985 is frequently cited as one of the earliest and most influential discoveries in the development of nanotechnology. “In my view, this was a singular event in the history of nanotechnology,” said Neal Lane, senior fellow in science and technology at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy. “It not only created a whole new field of ‘fullerene chemistry,’ it immediately made feasible the notion of making things from the bottom up, just as physicist Richard Feynman had predicted 50 years earlier.” Fullerenes — the family of compounds that includes buckyballs and carbon nanotubes — remained the central focus of Smalley’s research until his death, and Smalley himself never shied away from espousing the importance of fullerenes, particularly carbon nanotubes. “(Fullerene research) probably has transcendent importance in many areas of technology and perhaps in society,” Smalley told Small Times magazine in 2001. “It’s a heady thing to be involved. It’s almost like church.” Due in part to Smalley’s leadership, the U.S. launched the NNI in 2000. NNI is a sweeping federal research-and-development program that coordinates the nanotech efforts of nearly two dozen federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense and NASA. NNI funding has more than doubled in the past five years, with federal spending for 2005 topping $1 billion. At the time of NNI’s creation, Lane served as assistant to the president of the United States for science and technology and director of the U.S. Office of Science and Technology Policy. He said Smalley played a crucial role in getting the initiative approved, both by President Clinton and by Congress. Smalley’s testimony on Capitol Hill, in particular, helped establish him as one of leading U.S. voices for nanotechnology. “Rick overwhelmingly carried the day,” said Caltech’s James Heath, one of Smalley’s Ph.D. students on the buckyball discovery, who has himself risen to become a leading voice for nanotechnology. “He sat there in front of Congress with no hair, as a result of the chemotherapy, and talked about the promise of nanotechnology for cancer and other diseases and how it would pay off for his children. It was absolutely riveting. Even the text is riveting, but to have been a member of Congress listening to it must have been something else. “Rick was, more than anybody else, a Moses for the field. Without a Moses, there’s no trip to the promised land,” Heath said. At the request of U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, one of Smalley’s longstanding supporters in Washington, a prayer for Smalley and his family was offered by the Senate chaplain this morning at the Capitol. Smalley’s fervent belief that nanotubes were a wonder material that could solve some of humanity’s most intractable problems — such as clean energy, clean water and economical space travel — led him to crusade for more public support for science and to take up the mantle of business after more than three decades in the laboratory. Smalley helped found Carbon Nanotechnologies Inc. in 2000 to make sure his discoveries made it to the marketplace where they could benefit society. In particular, Smalley was convinced that nanotubes could only be used to solve society’s problems if they were manufactured in bulk and processed economically. In 2002, Smalley embarked upon a two-year crusade to promote the use of nanotechnology to solve what he described as the No. 1 problem facing humanity in the 21 st century — the need for cheap, clean energy. Smalley crisscrossed the country, gave dozens of keynote addresses, testified before Congress and met with countless government, academic and industrial leaders. “Rick cared little about honors and much more about how applications of nanoscience might help resolve pressing human problems in energy accessibility, food supplies and medical diagnosis and treatment,” said Malcolm Gillis, University Professor, the Ervin Kenneth Zingler Professor of Economics and professor of management at Rice. “In meetings with Rick in the past year, it was clear to me his primary reasons for his dogged, determined battle against his disease had first to do with his family and second with his desire to witness at least a few of the social benefits he expected from buckyballs, buckytubes and other nanoparticles.” Smalley was born June 6, 1943, in Akron, Ohio, and spent most of his youth in Kansas City. He was the youngest of four children. The childhood influences he credited most for his success were his mother’s love of science, the skills she imparted in draftsmanship, his father’s tenacity and mechanical abilities and the inspirational example of his aunt, who was one of the first women in the country to earn a Ph.D. in chemistry. Inspired to science by the launch of Sputnik in 1957, Smalley said he first became serious about education at the age of 16. In an autobiography written for the Nobel committee in 1996, Smalley also credited his high school chemistry teacher, Victor Gustafson, as a key inspiration. “[Chemistry] was the first class I had ever taken with my sister Linda, who was a year older than I, and was a far better student than I had ever been,” Smalley said. “The result was that by the end of the year, my sister and I finished with the top two grades in the class. We hardly ever missed a question on an exam. “It was an exhilarating experience for me and still ranks as the single most important turning point in my life, even from my current perspective of nearly four decades later.” At his aunt’s urging, Smalley enrolled as a chemistry major at Hope College in Holland, Mich., in 1961. He transferred to the University of Michigan two years later, earning his bachelor’s degree in 1965. Smalley began his Ph.D. studies at Princeton in 1969 following four years work at Shell Chemical Co. in New Jersey and the birth of his eldest son, Chad. His studies in the Princeton laboratory of Elliot R. Bernstein marked Smalley’s first exposure to the discipline of chemical physics, and Smalley said he learned from Bernstein “a penetrating, intense style of research that I had never known before.” Smalley came to Rice as an assistant professor in 1976 following three years of postdoctoral research at the University of Chicago under Donald H. Levy. Lane said Smalley rapidly became “a major intellectual force” in chemistry and chemical physics at Rice, helping to found the Rice Quantum Institute in 1979. He was named the Gene and Norman Hackerman Chair in Chemistry in 1982 and was appointed a professor of physics in 1990. “Rick made great contributions to science,” Curl said. “While fullerenes and nanotubes dominated the end of his research career, he had made many contributions of towering magnitude before them.” Smalley was the pivotal force in the development of nanoscience and technology at Rice. He foresaw the potential of the discoveries emerging at this scale and moved with characteristic intensity to forge Rice’s program as the founding director of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST). His efforts resulted in the construction of Dell Butcher Hall and the endowment of chairs and the recruitment of faculty pursuing nano-related research in departments throughout science and engineering. Indeed, almost a quarter of Rice’s faculty hires in science and engineering since 1985 have expertise relevant to nanoscale science and technology, and innumerable others have incorporated this area into their research agenda. This robust and enthusiastic community will continue the tradition of excellence and vision that Smalley initiated almost two decades ago. “I think of Rick as the father of nanotechnology in the sense that, better than anyone else, he articulated the vision of its future and how it would impact the world, and he did so in a kind of universal language which was understandable and inspiring to everyone,” said William Barnett, trustee emeritus and former chair of the Rice Board of Trustees. Throughout his career, Smalley maintained a strong commitment to teaching and public service. For example, Smalley still taught undergraduate chemistry in the fall of 1996 when the Nobel Prize was announced. “One key thing I learned from Rick that I try to teach my students is that we are here doing science because the taxpayers have given us a license to do that,” Heath said. “We need to do great science that can change the world we live in, and we need to be sure that we can always explain to the average nonscientist on the street why their investment is worthwhile.” Even while battling cancer, Smalley maintained a hectic work and travel schedule and an intense focus on his research. As director of the Carbon Nanotechnology Laboratory, he continued to develop foundational technologies for carbon nanotube production and processing. One of Smalley’s most ambitious programs, the “Armchair Quantum Wire” project, was begun in April with $11 million funding from NASA. Smalley described the quantum wire during his acceptance of the Distinguished Alumni Award from Hope College in May, calling it “a continuous cable of buckytubes that we expect will conduct electricity 10 times better than copper yet have only one-sixth the weight, a zero coefficient of thermal expansion, and a tensile strength greater than steel. If we succeed, we’ll be able to rewire the world, replacing aluminum and copper in virtually every application and permitting a vast increase in the capacity of the nation’s electrical grid.” Smalley was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science, the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was the recipient of countless honors, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from Small Times magazine (2003), the Glenn T. Seaborg Medal from UCLA (2002), the American Carbon Society Medal (1997), the Franklin Medal from the Committee on Science and the Arts of The Franklin Institute (1996), Hewlett-Packard Europhysics Prize from the European Physical Society (1994), the Welch Award in Chemistry from the Robert A. Welch Foundation (1992), Ernest O. Lawrence Memorial Award from the U.S. Department of Energy (1992) and the Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics from the American Physical Society (1991). While the Nobel Prize won him worldwide recognition, the award carried a special significance for members of the Rice community because it resulted directly from work carried out on the campus. “When Rick and Bob won the Nobel Prize, it broke a boundary and forever changed the way people think about Rice,” said James Crownover, chair of the Rice Board of Trustees. “With that achievement, they showed that with imagination, inspiration and commitment, there are no boundaries to what Rice and its people can accomplish.” From the moment of their discovery, buckyballs attracted scientific attention worldwide. Carbon, after all, was believed to be one of the most stable of all elements, with two primary forms — graphite and diamond. The discovery of a third form was astounding to many, and it presaged the dawning of a new era in the physical sciences in which scientists could exert an unprecedented level of control over materials. Shaped like soccerballs and no wider than a strand of DNA, buckyballs are molecules of pure carbon. Each contains 60 carbon atoms arranged in a hollow sphere. The atomic arrangement of the carbon atoms in buckyballs resembles two conjoined geodesic domes, and Smalley coined the name “buckminsterfullerene” in honor of famed architect and geodesic dome inventor Buckminster Fuller. Smalley was fond of pointing out that the machinery of life itself, at the most basic level of DNA and protein encoding, draws its power from controlling matter with atomic precision. He coined the term “wet” nanotechnology to apply to the biological systems that operate at the nanoscale and “dry” nanotechnology to the physical/chemical systems that nanotechnologists were developing. At one point in the early years following the discovery of buckyballs, he said that biology was the only working nanotechnology. His vision was to work at the interface between these wet and dry systems — the wet/dry interface — to bring the range of systems that could be generated in the dry realm to bear on the wet world of biology and to create entirely new systems. “Rick could focus so completely on his goals, and he could inspire his students and his colleagues to a similar focus,” said Kathleen Matthews, dean of the Wiess School of Natural Sciences and the Stewart Memorial Professor of Biochemistry. “He had the ability to persuade others with a rare intensity of thought and spirit. He brought both passion and intellect to his work, and he displayed a degree of dedication and engagement that could motivate others to new levels of achievement.” Similar words were echoed by Curl: “Rick was a visionary, and his charisma and logic made those he worked with buy into the vision. Rick convinced us that we could be better, stronger and take more chances if we just tried. I hope that we don’t forget — then his legacy to Rice will make a lasting transformative difference.” last_img read more

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