Lionel Messi, others undergo surprise drug tests

first_imgLionel Messi and his fellow Argentinian World Cup squad members were subjected to an unexpected anti-doping test on Tuesday, a day after the squad convened for the start of a training camp in the Buenos Aires suburbs.According to Argentine sports channel TyC Sports, six FIFA-appointed doctors were sent to the team’s training base in Ezeiza, where players were forced to train inside due to the cold, foggy conditions.Lionel MessiMidfielders Fernando Gago and Ever Banega trained separately from the rest of the squad with the pair still working their way back from injury.Meanwhile Angel Di Maria, who helped Real Madrid win the Champions League final on Saturday, touched down Tuesday in Buenos Aires before taking a private jet to his hometown Rosario. He is scheduled to join the group at the end of the week. Two-time world champions Argentina, who haven’t been past the quarter-finals since the 1990 World Cup, will play debutants Bosnia in their Group F opener on June 15.The South Americans have also been drawn alongside Iran and African Cup of Nations champions Nigeria.last_img read more

Colonel George M. Boyd, Tuskegee Airman to speak Oct. 28 in Wellington

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (2) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down Bird fan · 354 weeks ago I hope I can come and see him. Is this open to the public? Report Reply 0 replies · active 354 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Cherie Graham · 354 weeks ago I hope to see, and listen to such an honorable man, amazing what he has seen, and survived !!! Report Reply 0 replies · active 354 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Colonel George Boyd Submitted to Sumner Newscow — On Monday, October 28, 87-year-old former Tuskegee Airman, George M. Boyd, Colonel in the Civil Air Patrol and former Wing Commander of the CAP and Retired Major in the United States Air Force, Wichita, will present the program “Keeping Our Dreams Alive”, a program about patriotism and being American, to the Sumner County Historical and Genealogical Society at the Wellington Senior Center, 308 South Washington, Wellington at 6:30 p.m. Contact Jane Moore at 620-447-3266 in case of inclement weather.Boyd said that he was 18 when he went into the service on the 20th of January of 1944, and when asked if he was afraid, Boyd replied, “Yes, we knew that you could get killed in training or on the battle field. Everyone knew you were in harm’s way when you put that uniform on. Everyone was scared.”Boyd said that he learned to fly at Tuskegee during World War II. It was a time when African Americans were not allowed to serve in the military alongside whites, nor allowed to take pilot training at the same facility as whites.  It was a time when German prisoners brought stateside were treated better than African American soldiers.“I look at what the Nazi’s did,” Boyd said, “they were so wicked that the world was outraged. In World War II we knew we had to win the war. We would have been in bad trouble if we hadn’t won that war.”“The enemy was just as concerned about winning and they were as dedicated to winning as we were,” Boyd said, “that is why the war was so vicious and cruel.”Boyd also served during the Korean and the Vietnam Wars, became a radar intercept officer, and helped protect the fuel tanks for the bombers in Tule, Greenland.Boyd said that he welcomes questions about his Tuskegee experience, as well as his subsequent service, and will also share his experiences when he and three other original Tuskegee Airman went to Iraq, Kuwait, and Qatar in 2009 where they spoke to, visited, and signed autographs for approximately 6,000 to 7,000 US Service personnel that included Army, Navy, Air Force and civilians.“The job of the military is to maintain the framework of the Constitution. Our job is to protect the Nation,” Boyd said, “We really have a great country and we need to take care of it.”“I think it was an opportunity and an honor to serve the country,” Boyd said, “If I wasn’t overage and grayed I would be on active duty if they would let me.”last_img read more