Notre Dame News: Things to know

first_imgBiden, Boehner receive prestigious Laetare Medal amid outcry The Laetare Medal is considered one of the most prestigious awards for American Catholics. The 2016 medal was jointly awarded to Vice President Joe Biden and former Speaker of the House John Boehner, a gesture by University President Fr. John Jenkins to encourage bipartisan dialogue. The award sparked an outcry among students, alumni and conservative groups, who criticized the decision to award the pro-choice Vice President and the pro-death-penalty Speaker. Both politicians attended the 2016 commencement ceremony and received the medal. Obama speaks to 2009 graduates, 2016 election winner will be invited to 2017 commencement The University invites each newly-elected President of the United States to give the Commencement address the spring after inauguration. In 2009, President Barack Obama accepted the invitation, instigating a nationwide wave of criticism of the decision to invite a politician who was pro-choice and supported stem-cell research. Obama spoke at commencement and addressed the criticisms directly, encouraging people to find commonalities amid moral disagreements. As the 2016 election approaches, the University is again expected to invite whomever is elected. University in national spotlight over sexual assault cases In 2015, CNN released a documentary, “The Hunting Ground,” which examined how colleges and universities mishandle sexual assault cases. Featuring Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame, the documentary highlighted multiple cases where the University and the College failed to respond to reports by Saint Mary’s students who accused Notre Dame students of sexual assault. The documentary inspired activism by students, faculty and alumni to urge the College and the University to change their practices regarding sexual assault. University involved in legal battles In 2012, the University sued the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, seeking an exemption from the Obamacare requirement that employers provide contraceptive access. The suit and its appeals were ultimately unsuccessful. In 2015, ESPN sued the University for access to police records on student athletes accused of crimes. An appellate court sided with ESPN, saying NDSP was a public agency subject to open records laws, but it is unclear which records the network will get and when. As a result of the suit, a bill was introduced in the Indiana state legislature intended to clarify open records laws, but was vetoed by Gov. Mike Pence. First official LGBT student organization formed2013 saw the first meetings of PrismND, Notre Dame’s first official organization for LGBT students. Students had been attempting to start such an organization for decades, and after a months-long review of resources for the LGBT community at Notre Dame, resulting in a pastoral plan, PrismND was approved. Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, who built ND for 50 years, dies in 2015 During Hesburgh’s 30-year presidency, women were admitted to the University and laypeople to the board of trustees, and Notre Dame’s national profile rose. The Holy Cross priest, who was photographed arm-in-arm with Martin Luther King, Jr. and said a Mass in the then-Soviet Union, was a campus institution — students considered it an honor to visit his office on the 14th floor of the library named after him. When he died at 97, U.S. presidents and Nobel Prize winners offered condolences. He left a legacy of civil rights activism and academic freedom in Catholic education, as well as a premier Catholic research university.  Football team goes to 2013 national championship  After years of mediocre football at Notre Dame Stadium, the storyline changed dramatically in 2012, when the Irish posted a perfect regular season en route to a BCS National Championship Game loss to Alabama. A lights-out defense, led by Heisman Trophy runner-up linebacker Manti Te’o, propelled the Irish to the title game, but Notre Dame failed to mount a challenge in South Florida, falling 42-14 to the Crimson Tide on the season’s biggest stage. University starts new construction projectsThe past several years saw much construction and renovation. Campus Crossroads, a $400-million project that added academic departments and student spaces to the football stadium, began in 2014 and is scheduled to be completed in 2017. In 2015, Hesburgh Library began a renovation which gave several floors a more open plan. Two new dorm buildings, Flaherty and Dunne Halls, were built, as was McCourtney Hall, a research building. Jenkins Hall, which will house the Keough School of Global Affairs, is slated to open in Fall 2017.  New college created for the first time in decadesIn 2014, the University announced the creation of the Keough School of Global Affairs, which will offer academic programs for undergraduate and graduate students, work with Notre Dame’s centers abroad and other internationally-focused institutes and offer a new Masters in Global Affairs. Changes proposed for Notre Dame Core Curriculum Every 10 years, the University reviews its Core Curriculum, the set of courses that every student must take. The process began in 2014, briefly sparking fears that the University theology requirement would be reduced or eliminated. A Core Curriculum committee solicited ideas and feedback from the Notre Dame community and in November 2015 released its recommendations, proposing a revision that would reduce the total number of core courses and require students to take classes in broader categories such as “quantitative analysis” and “aesthetic analysis,” as opposed to math or fine arts. A final report will be presented to University administration this semester. University decides to admit undocumented students In 2013, the University admitted and gave financial aid to undocumented students for the first time, following an admissions policy revision that considered undocumented applicants domestic, not international, students. The University was following guidelines from the Obama administration, which as an executive order had given undocumented people under a certain age the opportunity to defer deportation, opening up the possibility of higher education for many. PE course replaced with Moreau First-Year Experience For decades, Notre Dame required its freshmen to pass a swim test or take swimming lessons, as well as complete a physical education course. For the incoming class of 2019 those requirements were eliminated to some controversy. The replacement was the Moreau First-Year Experience, a one-credit class that addressed aspects of wellness, cultural competence and student life. Tags: Construction, Core Curriculum, football, Fr. Ted, Freshman Orientation 2016, Hesburgh, Keough school, Laetare Medal, lawsuit, Moreau First Year Experience, news, Obama, PrismND, sexual assault, Things to know, undocumented studentslast_img read more

1984 Will Shutter in London’s West End

first_imgThe West End transfer of the Almeida Theatre hit 1984 will close on August 23. Based on George Orwell’s classic 1949 novel and adapted and co-directed by Robert Icke and Duncan Macmillan, the show officially opened on May 8 at the Playhouse Theatre. April, 1984. 13:00. Comrade 6079, Winston Smith, thinks a thought, starts a diary, and falls in love. But Big Brother is always watching. 1984 has design by Chloe Lamford, lighting design by Natasha Chivers, sound design by Tom Gibbons and video designed by Tim Reid.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

Evans – we weren’t at lowest ebb

first_img Press Association United emerged from a difficult few days by claiming a much-needed victory against Liverpool at Old Trafford on Wednesday night. Whilst booking a Capital One Cup fourth-round encounter with Norwich is not expected to be high on the list of David Moyes’ achievements in his debut campaign as Red Devils chief, at the present time, Javier Hernandez’s solitary goal was significant. Jonny Evans has known the atmosphere at Manchester United’s training ground to be worse than it was at start of this week. It cannot have escaped Moyes’ notice United benefited from the eight changes made to the team that lost at Manchester City. Almost all the new faces, Evans and Hernandez included, were making rare appearances after Moyes opted to stick largely with the same group of players for those testing opening five Premier League matches. In hindsight, it looks like a flawed, if understandable move, which might well have been avoided. Had either Mike Phelan or Rene Meulensteen from Ferguson’s backroom team been retained, they might have been able to caution against asking Rio Ferdinand and Nemanja Vidic to push themselves through three games in a week. The players themselves would argue otherwise but the evidence of the past week, and Ferguson’s selection policy dating back to 2010, indicates the pair can no longer do it. A lack of summer reinforcements beyond Marouane Fellaini may become an issue as the season progresses, whilst circumstance dictated Wilfried Zaha remained on the bench last night when, in less fraught circumstances, it was an ideal chance for a youngster – who nevertheless has appeared for England at senior level – to gain some valuable experience. Yet Moyes would counter that some of the selection problems are not of his making. The clamour for Shinji Kagawa’s inclusion has been growing steadily, whilst Hernandez had been restricted to a sum total of just 34 minutes’ action prior to Wednesday night’s game. There is, apparently, no coincidence the pair were on Confederations Cup duty for Japan and Mexico this summer, and have since been required to play in two lots of international matches. “The start we had meant I felt we had to get a settled group of players for the opening five or six games,” said Moyes. “As well as that we were still trying to bring some players back from international duty who came back, went away again, came back and went away again. “It was difficult to get them in the right condition all at the same time.” Moyes may have reservations about individuals within the squad he has inherited. Nevertheless, he might also remind himself that someone like Evans has won as many Premier League titles as Frank Lampard and John Terry and can be trusted to get the job done, particularly against lesser teams, rather than being completely inactive, as has been the case with the Northern Ireland star. “That was my first start of the season and it was a tough game to come into,” said Evans. “When you have Sturridge and Suarez up front you are never going to have an easy evening. “But we defended every set piece well and were blocking shots. “It is what you need in games like that.” For without it, Moyes would have been facing yet more questions over his suitability for the onerous task of replacing the man whose name adorns the stand his dug-out faces and whose image is cast in a statue outside the ground. Yet even in the eye of the storm that raged following Sunday’s 4-1 hammering at Manchester City, Moyes still kept doing the right things. He fronted up to the media on Tuesday, when it would have been far easier to send someone else to speak on his behalf. And he managed to stop a cloud of gloom descending on what is officially known as the Aon Training Complex, but fans and players continue to refer as Carrington. “I have been on the training ground where the atmosphere has been worse than it was when we came in the day after the game,” said Evans. “We had no complaints at the weekend. “Everyone was honest in their assessment that we didn’t apply ourselves the way we should have. “It is hard for the fans, the players and the manager as well. We just had to move on from it quickly.” last_img read more